The Today Program this morning again had the debate about what grades universities should require. This is something I’ve banged on about before. Some argue that it is discriminatory to require those who (like me) went to private school to get better grades. But these people seem to be ignoring some basic truths. The simple fact is that, every academic study I’ve ever seen has found that state school students at university get better grades at the end of their degree.

This is no surprise. Private schools are good at what they do. They coach students to get into universities ahead of their more able colleagues at state schools. This is why they are so expensive. But by the end of a four year (or, in England, three year) degree, it’s raw intelligence & hard work that shine through.

Universities guard these statistics closely. But the truth is simple. In order to choose those students who will get the best grades by the end of their degrees, universities must take into account the context in which their school leaving grades are achieved. This is not just fair, though it is. It is not just that it is necessary in order to build a more just society, though it is. It is also in the direct interests of the universities.

The idea that we shouldn’t take the context of exam results into account is political correctness gone mad.

Adam Ramsay

About Adam Ramsay

Adam is Co-Editor of Open Democracy UK and a green activist based in Edinburgh. He co-founded Bright Green in 2010.